2ndlook

Why Schools, Hospitals, Political Parties don’t work in India. At least upto user expectations

Posted in Current Affairs, History, India, Media, politics by Anuraag Sanghi on August 18, 2012

If the Government has to declare that the Parliament is supreme, maybe the Parliament is no longer supreme. Is there a rumble gathering in Indian polity?

Clearly, the Indian has been less than a success in some fields. Notably health, education and producing venerable leaders.  |  A undated, unsigned RK Laxman cartoon.

Clearly, the Indian has been less than a success in some fields. Notably health, education and producing venerable leaders. | A undated, unsigned RK Laxman cartoon.

India – Failed State?

In the last sixty-five years of Indian independence, India has seen many successes – and had its share of failures, too.

Modern India is tempted to romanticize or demonize the Western and Islāmic influences and legacies – depending on the personal bias and predilection. This bias is not only popular but also widely prevalent in academia and the media.

Of the significant Indian failures has been healthcare, education and the Indian Politician. While many imports into India have been successful – like democratic elections, smooth handover of power after elections, public-sector enterprises, the software and automotive industry, there are three institutions that India has not been able to make a success of.

  • Health-care through hospitals
  • Education through schools
  • Venerable polity through political parties

Building an agenda

Yogendra Yadav, who is part of the 7-member panel that will guide the formation of Team Anna‘s political unit, makes some interesting points.

Will Party-Anna be significantly different. BJP had promised, falsely, that they will be different. |  Cartoon by Shreyas Navare on Friday, August 3, 2012 at 8:35 pm in blogs.hindustantimes.com

Will Party-Anna be significantly different. BJP had promised, falsely, that they will be different. | Cartoon by Shreyas Navare on Friday, August 3, 2012 at 8:35 pm in blogs.hindustantimes.com

Many of the Anna followers have had obvious difficulty in reconciling the strident anti-party rhetoric of the movement with its latest decision. Some have seen it as a betrayal. But if we step back from the specific context of the current discussion, both these assertions may not appear so incompatible with each other. There is no doubt a tension here, but this tension is necessary and perhaps even creative.

The dilemma of Team Anna provides a good lens to view our troubled relationship with the institution of the political party in the last 65 years. Political parties are both very robust and fragile, at once the magnet that draws people and pushes them away, ever-present and routinely hated. Hence the widespread ambivalence towards this institution. After all, founders and leaders of very different parties, such as Gandhi and M N Roy, ended up advocating party-less democracy. And it was Jayaprakash Narayan, an advocate of party-less democracy, who later formed the Janata Party.

The idea of the political party, an imported form of political organisation, has captured modern Indian political imagination. The institution of the party has acquired the same status in our political imagination as the institution of school in thinking about education or the institution of the hospital in thinking about disease and healing. The word ‘party’ is now used in almost every Indian language to refer not just to modern political parties that contest elections but also for any political grouping or faction in a local context. It is not uncommon to hear complains about ‘partybaji’, meaning groupism or factionalism, in a village.

This success is not confined to ideas and language. Very few other institutions can match political parties in the width and depth of their reach in this large and diverse country. Contrary to popular impression, fragmentation and proliferation of parties has actually contributed to deepening of their reach. The rise of regional and caste- or community- based parties has brought parties closer to the people. Between 1971 and 2004, the proportion of voting-age Indians who identified with a political party went up from 38% to 51%. During the same period, those who claimed to be a member of a political party went up three times, from 5% to about 15%.

In other words, the poli-tical party as an organisational format is here to stay. It has outlived proponents of party-less democracy and outpaced non-party political formations.

At the same time, the prevalent form of the political party does not enjoy much popular legitimacy. Even those who identify with a political party express an abstract disaffection with the nature and functioning of political parties in the country. Parties are held to be at the roots of all the problems in the country.

Some of the ills of the parties are nearly universal. Instead of being institutions that represent the peoples’ aspirations and demands, political parties have become election machines and patronage distribution networks that focus only on gathering votes by using all kinds of short cuts. While they talk about democracy and competition, most political parties in India lack even a modicum of internal democracy.

In our context political parties have acquired some special difficulties. The model of a centralised party does not easily fit with the scale and diversity of a county like India. As centralised ‘high command’ driven parties seek to reserve power for a coterie of leaders, if not a family, people do not experience parties as an entity that derives power from them. Greater number of parties does not necessarily mean greater political choice as different parties are effectively tied to the same policy. Party politics is not a nice word.

Having taken root in an alien soil, this tree has acquired a new shape. Its fruit tastes different from that of its counterpart in other parts of the world. Everyone consumes it, but few seem to like its taste.

This is the lesson Team Anna can learn from the experience of political parties since Independence. The political party is both inevitable and avoidable. While there is a need for a vehicle of political opinions and interests that seeks to direct state power, it is equally important that this vehicle be designed differently.

The new vehicle must not be focussed only on elections: struggle, constructive work and formation of ideas must be equally critical to a new kind of party. Instead of being the instrument of centralised power, it needs to recognise different levels of power at the regional and local levels. Instead of monopolising power, it needs to share power with other organisations and movements. It needs to build in norms of internal democracy. In other words it needs to build a political party that does not look or act like a political party.

via A broken trust – Times Of India.

Connecting with the media is illusory power. Connecting with this man will make the difference.  |  Ajit Nina cartoon posted on Monday, June 08, 2009 at 03:35:27 AM  in Mumbai Mirror captioned, 'The idea of 'one-man-one-post' was stolen by the Congress from us.'

Connecting with the media is illusory power. Connecting with this man will make the difference. | Ajit Nina cartoon posted on Monday, June 08, 2009 at 03:35:27 AM in Mumbai Mirror captioned, ‘The idea of ‘one-man-one-post’ was stolen by the Congress from us.’

Just no practice

Probably the one reason the Indian State has failed on health, education and political factionalism is tradition. The Indian State, governed by the traditional norms of भारत-तंत्र Bharattantra did not manage healthcare, education and factional politics.

European and Islāmic records are significantly silent on variations in legal systems and State policies. The only point of difference that British writers mention is the predisposition of the rulers towards various European factions and on the differences in social customs.

Standardization – without centralization

While there is a large body of European writing on the different social units, norms, groups, practices, there is little mention about the differences in polity. This points to a great degree of standardization in polity – yet, without a central authority. On most political issues there was national consensus, even though political control over the Indian geography was spread thinly among 1000 rulers.

This precedent goes right back to the Indus Valley-Saraswati Basin cities which were widely spread, highly standardized – yet there was no central authority.

This may seem strange, because according to our failed education system, the British Raj made the Indian nation. But the part that modern studies miss out completely, is how in भारत-तंत्र Bharattantra, Indian kings did not make laws. Indians kings could not even proclaim a different legal system for their ‘own’ kingdom. Their powers were severely proscribed.

So how did the extensive legal system of भारत-तंत्र Bharattantra that the Islāmic kings perverted, British Raj dehumanized, and modern India has forgotten, come into being.

Two men are what made the law

Much of modern Hindu Law, is based on the two major legal systems that existed in India at the start of the British Raj. This was the Vighneshwara’s Mitākṣarā and the Dāyabhāga system. Dāyabhāga based mainly on the Yajnavalkya-smrti, was updated by Jimutavahana sometime between the eleventh or thirteenth century. Widely used in Bengal, Odisha, Assam and North East, modern Bangladesh, Bihar, Nepal, it has significant overlap with the Mitākṣarā.

Mitākṣarā, criticized in Jimutvahana’s Dāyabhāga system, preceded the Dāyabhāga system. Also based on Yajnavalkya-smrti, Mitākṣarā is considered more classical – and Dāyabhāga as more synthetic. This is not to imply that Mitākṣarā and Dāyabhāga were the start of the Indian legal system. Both Mitākṣarā and Dāyabhāga, were based on Yajnavalkya-smrti – which itself is derived from Manusmriti. Vishnu-purana states that there were different ‘manus‘ for different eras.

So which Manu from which era wrote the Manusmriti is unclear – though it is usually believed that Vaivaswata Manu is the author.

Not that it helps.

Advent of Islāmic rule in India

Interestingly, both Mitākṣarā and Dāyabhāga texts are dated roughly around the time that initial Islamic rule began in India with the Slave Dynasty in Delhi – at the beginning of 13th century.

Were Vighneshwara and Jimutvahana major court figures – like Raja Todar Mal, whose writings on Indian Law helped Mughals to steer their way around the legal environment in India. Hardly anything is known about the individuals, except the extensive work that they left.

So, how did these anonymous, powerless Brahmins become law-makers – without armies, parliaments, courts, judges and lawyers. At least comparable to the Islāmic and European contemporaries.

Bombay-High & Y2K generations has not produced venerable political leadership. Instead we have a collusive democratic leadership, which conspires against us. Divide and rule continues.  |  Ajit Ninan caroon with a caption that reads 'Today it's a make-up artist who gets you votes, not your speech writer.';  posted on Friday, February 17, 2012 at 02:17:47 AM; source & courtesy - Mumbai Mirror

Bombay-High & Y2K generations has not produced venerable political leadership. Instead we have a collusive democratic leadership, which conspires against us. Divide and rule continues. | Ajit Ninan caroon with a caption that reads ‘Today it’s a make-up artist who gets you votes, not your speech writer.'; posted on Friday, February 17, 2012 at 02:17:47 AM; source & courtesy – Mumbai Mirror

Parliament is Supreme

While there is thin evidence that these Brahmins did have royal patrons, their legal standing did not depend on that patronage. More importantly, how did their writings cross the boundaries of the resident-kingdoms. From areas, where their patrons had power to areas where these two Brahmins had no influence, power or patronage?

State-controlled and managed models of the West, are relatively new to India. In the entire Anna-Baba campaign, the Indian Parliament kept repeating The Parliament Is Supreme. Did these repeated statements imply doubts about the supremacy of the Parliament?

Will the Anna-Baba political movement see re-birth of non-parliamentary legal systems?

Is that the flow – and the direction?

Anna-Baba are Opposites

This is in contradiction to the Anna campaign that has focussed on More State. Baba Ramdev’s campaign speeches have been largely based on a Lesser State. Can this basic disagreement be bridged?

Can Anna-Baba come together?

Team Anna’s campaign made much about the fact that some of them were Magsaysay award winners – while Baba’s campaign is more rooted in the Indian political tradition – भारत-तंत्र Bharattantra.

Team Anna has usually got excellent media support – and allegedly ‘foreign support. In case of Baba Ramdev, the commercial success of his Ramdev products points toward a deeper connect to the Indian Voter. Baba Ramdev has been building his campaign for nearly ten years now – while Anna campaign has sputtered for little over 10 months.

Anna-Baba may seem like peas in a pod. But they are vastly different by the way of agenda, policies, inpiration.  |  Cartoon titled Anna Hazare Vs Baba Ramdev by MANJUL on 8.12.2012.

Anna-Baba may seem like peas in a pod. But they are vastly different by the way of agenda, policies, inpiration. | Cartoon titled Anna Hazare Vs Baba Ramdev by MANJUL on 8.12.2012.

Anna’s campaign was able to make Indian polity sit up – and take note. Baba Ramdev has been largely ignored by India’s political leadership – and the media. While Anna’s campaign has been over-analyzed to death, the Baba-Ramdev-phenomenon has been buried under silence by the media.

While the Anna-campaign for all appearances is a single-point campaign, Baba Ramdev’s campaign has been across a broad front – with much work on building a unique agenda.

Many have claimed credit for Anna-campaign’s success, starting with the media and RSS having the last word. In case of Baba Ramdev, his movement has been based on his own work and agenda.

Electoral politics on the cusp of a major change?  |  Cartoon By Ajit Ninan (Times Of India) on March 26, 2009

Electoral politics on the cusp of a major change? | Cartoon By Ajit Ninan (Times Of India) on March 26, 2009

Gimme, Gimme

How will the Indian Voter manage this divergence?

Will it give power to Anna-campaign – and make Baba Ramdev powerful enough to question the polity?

Early days …


19 Responses

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  1. admin said, on August 18, 2012 at 4:57 pm

  2. panduranghari said, on August 18, 2012 at 6:01 pm

    The essay was good but there were glaring inconsistencies.

    While the idea of democracy itself is alien to our land, what Bharatvarsh historically had was ‘passive autocracy’ in the form of King who wielded the final word. However, he (or she) never was the chief decision maker. The decisions were taken by the council of ministers. The King was the ultimate arbiterer. The king could loose a ‘dharma yuddha’ thus loose his kingdom and also his position. He perhaps depending on his stature became a important minister for the winning king thus retaining the few extra privileges of the king.

    Democracy as it is, has failed. Not just in Bharatvarsh but also in the west. The future for Bharatvarsh and perhaps the rest of humanity is not democracy.

    Passive autocracy permits the right sort of people to come up. The world is changing around us. Once the debt based paradigm of measuring the global wealth changes, the ideas which we have held on to so dearly will seem very alien to us. The real meritocracy will prevail.

    And real meritocracy means no socialism. And this will be demanded by the new system. Its a de facto change not de jure. The only way forward for us is passive autocracy.

    • Anuraag Sanghi said, on August 19, 2012 at 6:54 pm

      Bharatvarsh historically had was ‘passive autocracy’ in the form of King who wielded the final word. However, he (or she) never was the chief decision maker. The decisions were taken by the council of ministers. The King was the ultimate arbiterer.

      In भारत-तंत्र Bharattantra, Indian kings did not make laws. Indians kings could not even proclaim a different legal system for their ‘own’ kingdom. Their powers were severely proscribed.

      The system of a ministerial darbar really started after Krishnadevaraya – and Tenali Ram, echoed by Akbar and Birbal. Before that we have rare cases of a Vikramaditya and Raja Bhoja.

      But Indian kings started with nobles, ministers only after Islamic rule which came with Desert Bloc ideas.

      So this idea of ‘passive’ or benign autocracy is not based on history or evidence. Probably if you read the post on Bharattantra linked above you will get a true idea of what Indian polity was like.

      • A fan of your content said, on August 21, 2012 at 3:32 pm

        • The Bharat tantra model of governance did not look at the king as one who does no wrong (Rex non protest peccare), unlike the Westphalian nation-state model. The king was always a part of society, not one above it. Hence the concept of “Rajdharma”. Without the need of laws, lawyers and courts, the justice delivery mechanisms were decentralized and easily approachable. Whatever the grievance, this today is no longer the case. Hence the resort to widespread protest to redress grievances. E.g Anna and Baba Ramdev.
        • We may credit Gandhi with satyagraha, but, the concept of peaceful protest against tyranny was an outcome of this construct. Gandhi bought this fundamental truth to political practice by saying that no one can take away the right of peaceful protest to an unjust law. The important thing is Justice, not Law.

        • Anuraag Sanghi said, on August 21, 2012 at 4:09 pm

          The King as an indolent oriental despot, benign or whimsical, is a caricature of Indian polity.

          Half of this country calls itself as a Kumar, Raja, Raj (like Rajendra, Rajesh), Indra (like in Surendra), Ish (like in Suresh). We had centuries of monarchy, where the kings were venerable and respected.

          Gandhiji brought that essential Indian-ness to the anti-colonial protest that paralleled the violent anti-British activities of people like Bagha Jatin, Chafekar Brothers and later Chandrasekhar Azad, Bhagat Singh, etc. Caught in this pincer movement, the British had no place – but to head for the EXIT door.

          The generation that grew up as Midnight’s Children (1950-1975) had a pantheon of venerable leaders. Gandhiji, Bhagat Singh, Sc Bose, Tilak, Nehru, Patel, Savarkar, etc.

          The Bombay High generation (1975-2000) also had many saw many capable leaders – Jaya Prakash Narayan, Vinoba Bhave, Indira Gandhi, Lal Bahadur Shastri, achievers like Vikram Sarabhai, Dhirubhai Ambani.

          The Y2K generation (2000-2025) only seems to be negative.

          This generation has yet to produce a leader of any stature – unless you want to count Amitabh Bachchan as icon. Bachchan as an icon is also relevant because he is now respected for resurrecting his career, his activism, his gravitas, – and not anymore for his glamour.

          But generally, we are now so busy pulling leaders that we cannot see the context. Every Twitterer, each FaceBooker, all bloggers pronounce judgements on Gandhiji, Nehru – with about 0.1% context.

          This would be OK – if they had parallel achievement to back them.

          All Gas, Full Play, Some Work and Little Money make Jack a Silly Boy.

          On the plus side, the economy the Y2K generation have inherited, they have carefully utilized to create global opportunities for themselves. Most see themselves as second to none.

          Paradoxically, they dont see the contradiction between the Indian Government as 2nd class while seeing themselves as No.1.

          • panduranghari said, on August 21, 2012 at 7:58 pm

            The y2k generation which includes me do not have the political say yet. They will have their word, for sure. It may be the word of guillotine ala Revolution Francoise. The importance of understanding dharma cannot be understated. Being a follower of Rajiv Malhotra, I try to spend my time understanding dharma as it should be understood. The y2k generation has no living leaders true, but Swami Vivekananda, ramkrushna paramhansa, patanjali , living sages like swami dayanand saraswati can will and are showing the way.

            As west is dying and as I see myself drawn back home, I wish to set up a Vedic dharma school where it will be possible to get education in a gurukul system. We need gurus, we need people to learn our Puranas, Vedas, Upanishads. We need to make every child a complete man by doing dnyanyog, karmayog, arthayog, kamayog thus making rajyog possible.

            • Anuraag Sanghi said, on August 21, 2012 at 8:13 pm

              y2k generation which includes me do not have the political say yet

              They can have the political say – whenever they want it. They are the largest demographic segment in India. .

              They will have their word, for sure. It may be the word of guillotine ala Revolution Francoise. The importance of understanding dharma cannot be understated.

              I would be very surprised. Revolution and revolts are a Desert Bloc feature.

              The y2k generation has no living leaders true, but Swami Vivekananda, ramkrushna paramhansa, patanjali , living sages like swami dayanand saraswati can will and are showing the way.

              I think the Y2K Generation will need more rooted leaders. The nature of the Desert Bloc keeps changing. Maya. Till there is someone who can break Desert Bloc maya, it will not work. Past leaders are no good – because their answers worked in their time. Their principles are timeless – but how we apply those principles to our situation, we need to innovate.

              As west is dying and as I see myself drawn back home, I wish to set up a Vedic dharma school where it will be possible to get education in a gurukul system. We need gurus, we need people to learn our Puranas, Vedas, Upanishads. We need to make every child a complete man by doing dnyanyog, karmayog, arthayog, kamayog thus making rajyog possible.

              Just remember one thing. We cant go back in time. We can take inspiration. We can learn from the past. But we cant go back. The Kaal chakra keeps moving. No going back – or recreating the ‘golden’ past.

              • panduranghari said, on August 22, 2012 at 9:14 am

                We can learn form the past but we cannot go back.

                I agree with this assessment. The kal chakra has reached a stage where if we do not learn from the things of the past, we will be nothing but a memory. A smriti. We should not let the shruti be lost.

                I disagree with your assertion that there will be no revolution as its is a desert bloc feature.

                There was once a Raja called Shivaji and what he achieved was nothing short of a revolution. I am talking revolution in those terms. The revolution like Arab spring is all nothing but a sham to install puppet regimes.

                What we need right now is knowledge and understanding of how we got here and why we got here. KNOWLEDGE and UNDERSTANDING.

                I know you have made a sincere attempt to do a ‘purva paksha’ about our traditions and the national psychology using the history as a guideline.

                The 100th monkey effect when realised itself becomes a self sustaining movement which is grass root in its origin and sustainence.

                The Y2K generation do not know what they are fighting for. Come on honestly tell me what does the y2k generation want? cue Lou Bega – Mambo no 5. -A bit of macdonalds in my life, a bit of levi strauss in my hive, a little bit of facebook is good for me, a little bit of katrina kaif is what i seek- no they really do not seek this. The empty shells of Americana is not what a common man in Bharat seeks. He or she may be living in the swankiest part of south mumbai or the poorest jharkhand,

  3. Sridhar said, on August 19, 2012 at 6:11 am

    Can’t completely agree on what you said… primarily because what you say is somewhat unrealistic. Would like to add some of my points, would really like to hear your opinions on these:

    1. How to bring the olden systems and incorporate them in our society

    2. The idea of democracy originated from India, the other bureaucratic processes of it are a boon of west,which now has become a pain in the ass to our society

    3. Centralization of India (One language,One goal, One dream) must be the primary goal of politicians, somethings that is too late to do now it seems. Let me explain in more detail… a muslim will elect a person who is most probably a musim or a muslim sympathizer to ensure “protection”. I have lived in foreign countries before, and believe me , on a personal level I have chosen leaders that promoted the interests of immigrants and made their lives a little easier, minorities might do something similar.

    4. Failure of foreign system or failure of common man to recognize the same mistake being repeated again??
    I think the number of scams that have happened since 1950 till today (latest being the coal scam which gulped 33 bln dollars of taxpayer’s money, with the help of which 30 arihant class submarines could have been bought). Politicians of India don’ give two hoots about the national security or the benefits of the nation. I strongly believe that we could have had a massive revolution in research and infrastructre IF there was a political will to do so. Gujrat, a merely developing state with nothing much to talk of has skyrocketed in growth in the last decade since MODI took over. Gujrat has been marking a growth rate of 15% for quite a time now.

    5.Severe disinterest of people and a lot of propoganda : I once asked my 12 year old friend (this was in 2003) which political party he would support if he had a chance, he simply said, congress. I asked why. and he replied saying “you know, I have seen them working for people their ads give a real good impression and that’s why I think they are good for people. People themselves are strong supporters of congress in their secularism propoganda… They have asked for India’s condition.

    6. Politicians don’t care – Mafia nexus, especially christian and muslim, the dessert bloc religions affects the policy of India deeply, in turn turn damaging everyone’s life. I have heard once that a poliician agreed to sell India’s secrets when he was bribed with $50,000 by a KGB agent. To be true, there are only NRIs or people like you who really wish good for the country, most of Indians have moved on and have accepted their third worldship atleast it seems so. I am sorry, even I feel hurt.

  4. admin said, on August 19, 2012 at 9:09 am

  5. masculineffort said, on August 25, 2012 at 4:59 am

    Friend, may I request you to do a post about the dispute regarding the recently unearthed treasure in the Padmanabhaswamy temple in Kerala?

  6. A Fan of Your Blog said, on September 4, 2012 at 1:54 pm

    Anuraag — Another great blog post. I finally found the time to read it. I agree with your observations on the lack of appeal of political parties and related institutions. One more institution that Indians have struggled grappling with is the court of law itself. The Judiciary continues to drag cases and finds little respect because it does not appeal to the Indianness of Indians.

    I would like to learn more about the two legal systems. The Banglapedia link has limited info. I scouted the article for more links, may be I just missed them somehow. If you have more pointers, I will appreciate it.

    Nice job pointing out differences between the Anna campaign and the Baba campaign. I had not seen it from this perspective. The Baba campaign “should” have more mass appeal, but I do not see much of that. My premise is that the current media is English speaking and has learned to look down upon indigenous movements, basically because it considers it beneath them to cover. The same reason why educated people in large cities scramble to show off how well they speak English. If your English is not that great, they show off by speaking Hindi. The local language is the language of last resort.

    All this makes me wonder if we can ever really empower the local villager anymore? The effects of this behavior are far reaching. We are losing our identity, culture, traditions and ancient wisdom. There is mass exodus of people from rural centers to urban centers (because they want to be “developed” too). Somehow I feel these changes are irreversible. And that is very sad.

    Coming back to Anna and Baba, without the mass appeal, both have and will continue to fizzle out. We will need either another Gandhi or Vishnu-avatar to change status quo.

    • Neelabh said, on September 10, 2012 at 2:07 am

      It is very stupid to equate Hindi with English as being some oppressive language. People are forced to learn an outsiders language asit forms the basis for your career. This is utter stupidity, this creates all those hi-fi west’s *promoter* jokers that have now become abig part of the media, movies and serials. This rot isquite deep within and therefore should be burned from the root

      admin note – *promoter* has replaced an expletive in original comment. Neelabh; I suggest that you take care of your language. This forum works on the belief that good ideas dont need bad language; strong beliefs need good language.

      • A Fan of Your Blog said, on September 10, 2012 at 1:36 pm

        I did not say Hindi was oppressive. What I merely said was that there is now a well established hierarchy where the native languages have become the bottom rung. Merely stating the truth. You can draw your own conclusions.

        Why does that bother me? Cos native languages have become the lower class worker’s languages. This is despite have a lot of exquisite literature in the native languages. Till about 10-15 yrs ago, when people from other states came to the state, they would pick up the native language. Now, somehow, there is a disdain for the local language in the minds of the locals. Which does not fare well. All this is a deep rooted inferiority complex for what is ours.

        • Sridhar said, on September 11, 2012 at 1:31 am

          Sigh, I seriously get stuck when arguing about this, but still please excuse me and let me try??
          The first goal of ours should be to establish a primary understandable language (hindi in this case and later sanskrit) WITHOUT elinimating the native language. Theproblem now is the extreme macaulayite disease that has grasped the entire country. Eliminating english or atleast the stupid enigma that learning and speaking (therefore acting) like an english man would make you a superior person. This kind of slave mentality willony make us a second rate citizen of some english country. The basicsolution I suggest is to establish Hindi first, use it as much as you can and then just proceed to establish Sanskrit in the locales. Most of the local languages come from sanskrit and contrary to the belief of sanskrit being the language of Brahmins only (not sure if you believe in it or not, but I have heard this stupid excuse every now and then by dalits to not accept sanskrit) was spoken by most of Bhartiyas. Until and unless we “connect” to our <5000 year old culture completely, we cannot blend in the knowledge that our ancestors have gained in the past. If you observe, british introducedenglish and abolished sanskrit as much as possible to alienate Indians from the history of their land, written by their ancestors!!!, by doing this, the Indians would have no choice but to gulp down the bullshit (like AIT theory, white supremacism, macaulitism etc.) that has been forced down our throats since generations. My anxiousness with spread of english is not a mere paranoia but a firm belief that the "I want to believe" attitude of westernized Indians who like to gulp down whatever is thrown at them by the west will eventually remove well based facts and truths about our culture and existence of 10,000 years. Just like erasing sanskrit essentially erased our memories of whatever happened before the 1800s (I know,it's not completely erased, but the picture is highy foggy). Establishing Hindi should be our main goal, I know people in south India have severely opposedit, but it is, to put it mildly, not a good idea, the main aim should be establishing sanskrit as a national language regardless of how it affects the local languages.

          • panduranghari said, on September 11, 2012 at 7:05 am

            I do agree with Sridhar. The type of westernised Indians you can see amply in south Mumbai. Parents are just simple white collar workers but kids think they are just born in India and west is where they belong. This stereotype is promulgated in Hindi films. Gone are the days when mad hubcaps wearing a saree and serenaded by a dhoti wearing Kishore Kumar. We are trying to adopt western symbols of affluence like Gucci et al as a major aspect of being developed. Rajiv Malhotra has described the loss of identity due to western universalism.

            We need to make Sanskrut compulsory in all schools along with the local native language. The third language can be english or whatever. The education should be in Hindi or in local language. It will also prevent the spread of Christianity and Islam.

            • Raj Kishore said, on October 18, 2012 at 4:50 pm

              Comments like those above are a clear example of why India is so messed up. English should and will be our native language. I see absolutely no advantage in making Hindi our de facto native tongue- the world speaks English and so should a workforce of 1.3 billion Indians. You disgust me by making heinous comments against the spread of religions other than Hinduism. Your statement makes it philosophically evident that religion is pure hatred and should be abolished entirely.

              • Sridhar said, on October 18, 2012 at 10:46 pm

                Ummm…no, English is not our language and shouldn’t be spoken, while it is a temporary “patch” till a more dominant Hindi takes over and then sanskrit, people shouldn’t wet their pants on english. Also, you, sir, talk like an idiot… english is the dominant language now, but how long would it be?? Is it not better to propagate our language to the world and increase Hindi speakers? People like you are the one that mess this country up and have been messing this country for the past 70 years, not only the country but also it’s culture and thus it’s future. I can bet that there will be (actually are!!!) 5-6 other important languages across the world… Espanol (Spanish), Japanese, Chinese, Russian and of course, your dear english. People like you fit in a category of what I call “elves” or “mental slaves” , they have just accepted their defeat to another culture and now want their own culture to become like them. It is rather pathetic that our neighbour china, who is as progressive as us and then some more, proudly displays chinese(Mandarin) as it’s language , for your information, Mr. Raj, they also have regional languages and they speak them, and they also speak Mandarin.While, we (or rather, Indians like you, the “elves”) are too ashamed to display their culture. It looks stupid to me when I see a Hindi movie’s title in english alphabet, it looks stupid to me when half of our language has turned into a hybrid of english, the dialogues are in english, the mannerisms seem more english…this pathetic slave behaviour, which it seems,people like you enjoy a lot, gives a very very wrong impression to other countries. If you want an example, go to “BRICS” website… other 4 countries are not mad or anti-global that they have written their profile in their own language and then look at ours, ahhh, the great free “independent” Bharat that still uses a british language… because apparently our govt. is too ashamed to show our language. Raj Kishore, talking like *this* might be your hobby , but I hope you don’t act like one. Hindi, as language is given a step-motherly treatment, where, it is not spoken properly, not written properly and thanks to the slave mentality of people like you, who also rule this country, Hindi is not being developed properly. Hindi as a language should be made a permanent language and must be used in offices and schools as much as possible, this is Bharat, not Britan, why should I be forced to speak a foreign language to get a job?? why should my educational credentials be judged by my english vocabulary?? Isn’t it insane? Is this what we got freedom for?? So that we can speak british language, act like them and happily support english because it is a “global” language??…

                And Raj, kindly say, what will happen if Hindi is actually promoted by our govt instead of that fake and superficial english?? Do you know how many people around the globe are interested in learning Hindi?? It really is sickening to see pretenders like you who hide their language, who hide their culture,who hide their traditions to become global…. you know what Mr. Raj?? your so called global India is still not as popular as China in west, your so called global Indian leaders are miles away from connecting with the masses, you and your global India is a depressing face of our country where millions upon millions of Indian kids are daily being brainwashed into believing that their culture sucks, they are inferior to every other country out there, of course, including the ones that have “built” their country from our ancestor’s blood and flesh… and then there are idiots like you who happily wave this bullshit of “India should be global”… NO, INDIA SHOULD BE WHAT IT HAS BEEN FOR THE LAST 10,000 years… INDIA SHOULD FIRST BE BHARAT and then we will think about “global”.One more thing Raj, when you act like a superficial being, when you pretend to be a part of west and when you act like a pathetic slave, your patriotism,your “real” concern for the country and your perspective of India and Indians change… you start looking at them from west’s viewpoint, you start seeing inferiority in your people, you start seeing inferiority in your roots, you start seeing inferiority in your own family and friends and then, you are no longer an Indian, you become a coconut, brown from outside,white from Inside….

                That is the reality of “educated” people in India today… that is why they don’t care if the country goes in gutter, they don’t care if Indian culture goes to gutter, they don’t care if their country doesn’t go up, because they just give a fig about India or Indians!!! as soon as an Indian is born, he is bombarded with stupid Rhetoric and jokes about how our country is poor, about religion, about culture or about our institutions. This country will remain pathetic until Indians don’t identify their identity, unless they have a common language which btw, must be Hindi and then Sanskrit, till then, I don’t see a real future for the country.

                As far as your second claim about culture is concerned, it is indeed a threat to the country and frankly, to Dharmic religions (Hinduism,Sikhism,Jainism and Buddhism). A culture that just doesn’t believe in co-existence cannot be tolerated. If we don’t stop such weeds and fungus growing on our culture and identity ,then we are doomed for sure. Islam and christianity doesn’t believe in co-existence, that’s why you see 80 and 90% majorities in every european and Arabian countries and I suppose, being an english man,you might not have the idea, but a lot of people who tried to co-exist and tolerate these religions were mercilessly persecuted when these religions came in power and why do you need 100 or 1000 year old examples?? just look at porkistan, look at bangladesh, look at Myanmar…where are the Hindus and Buddhists who used to be 20 and 30% of the population?? Where are Hindus of Europe who worshiped their Gods and then were tortured and converted to christianity?? Mr.Raj, Hindus themselves are daily persecuted and discriminated against in this very country. West Bengal is seeing a rise in islamic fanaticism, almost every month a temple is burned or cow carcasses are thrown in the temple premises, the incidences of rape,murder and loot is more than it ever was, where is the media now ? Or are Hindus not people ? Look Mr. Raj, your “disgust” for keeping an eye on desert bloc culture won’t last long when they come for you and your family… when your wife would be raped to death,where your daughter and sons would be raped, when your elderly mother would be killed infront of your very own eyes, it has happened before in India itself, it is still happening in many areas and it will happen in future too if idiots like you are kept in power. Islam and Christianity are by idealogy , meant to kill those who disagree with them… any kind of external reform won’t change the basic ideals…

                PS – Sridhar – No personal attacks or pejoratives.

    • masculineffort said, on October 11, 2012 at 1:56 pm

      Why do Indian people always wait for some Gandhi/Vishnu Avatar like great man to sort things out. How about every Indian doing just a little bit to make life hard for the corrupt?


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